Tech PR in Asia: Myths and Misconceptions

Posted by on October 22, 2014 with 0 Comments

As a tech PR agency - one with clients that sell chips and components to mobile and CE device vendors – we are often asked china-featabout getting media coverage Asia.

That’s because most of the related manufacturing is done in places like China, Korea and Taiwan.  Companies that are trying to sell their core technology into these markets want the media to highlight their products and news there, just like they do here in the U.S.

I find that there is much confusion on the topic.  So, I thought I would share the most common myths and misconceptions, and set the record straight.

The information is based on our years of experience implementing campaigns for clients in APAC.  The media and economic landscapes are constantly evolving; to help us stay on the cutting edge, we work with people that have native language skills and media knowledge; great resources like team member Carmen Ren, who is from Shenzhen, China.

Below, please see the most common myths, and our response:

It’s all kind of the same there, right?  You pay the reporter and you get coverage

It is not all the same, the rules can vary from country to country, and within each country, based on the type of news or event.  While payment is sometimes expected, it is important to understand the customs, so that you don’t offer money when it is not appropriate – or know when it is fair game.

You need to hire an agency in each country / major region

There is no question that it helps to have PR “feet on the ground” in each country – people who know the language, can help you translate materials, and are close with the media.  But this quickly can get prohibitively expensive, and beyond the means of a smaller company or startup.

Fortunately, it is possible to get coverage from afar, if you know the right approach – and who to approach.

The government controls the media in China, and other countries – you are wasting your time with PR

While there is no denying government influence over the media, censors will simply not care about most tech vendor news.  There is a rich collection of media in China and other countries, and a growing focus and interest on business and technology news.

You can get by with great U.S. PR results, and communicating in English

Yes, the Internet does make the world a smaller place when it comes to communications – and many do look to the U.S. and major media coverage here.  But you will get much better PR results in Asia if you take the time to approach the media there directly, in their language, rather than hoping that they will somehow find your news.

For further clarification, I asked Carmen Ren about this point. She said:

“It depends on English proficiency in that region. E.g., in Singapore you can reach out in English, as that is their official Language; while in Mainland China, Chinese still dominates business communications. Hong Kong lies in-between.

It is also affected by the freedom of media access. Mainland Chinese heavily depend on domestic websites and internet services as news sources, thanks to the media censorship. (Google, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are banned there).

It’s true that mainland Chinese can still access some foreign sites, but as they are so used to the “home-grown” media environment, foreign contents just fall off the radar. So in mainland China, it is still necessary to communicate in Chinese and localize communication efforts.”

Want to learn more?

We will be blogging more on this topic, and issuing a series of briefs about how to maximize PR results in China, and other parts of Asia.  Please visit this link to learn more.

 

 

 

 

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John and Jonah Explore BuzzFeed at NewCo New York

Posted by on October 2, 2014 with 0 Comments

I attended the NewCo New York kickoff event on Tuesday evening. It was a great opportunity to network with like-minded bloggers, journalists, marketers and entrepreneurs and hear from top tech influencers.

As NewCo co-founder John Battelle (the search wonk and tech influencer who launched Industry Standard and co-founded the Web 2.0 Summit with Tim O’Reilly) explained, they were interested in launching a new event concept and came up with NewCo, a “conference-as-festival, where innovative companies throw open their doors to the public.”

It is about meeting with innovative NY Tech startups in their natural habitats, AKA their own offices (NewCo runs events in a number of cities around the world now – Austin is next).

I unfortunately did not get the chance to make the circuit, but really enjoyed kickoff’s centerpiece – a fireside chat between BuzzFeed Founder and CEO Jonah Perretti and Battelle. It was a lively and provocative conversation, and both gave as good as they got. John tweaked Jonah a bit about listicles, and Jonah fired back with some witty retorts.

Below, you can see some curated Tweets, via Storify.

 

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Why do the Media Swoon Over Apple? David Carr Opines

Posted by on September 16, 2014 with 0 Comments

It is an old saying in PR: “there is no accounting for taste.” Said another way (as we teach in media training), in any market, one company will rise to the top, fueled by “story energy”. The media will inexplicably latch on and just fawn.apple_wall___one_more_thing______by_thedevartist-d4bfml9

These thoughts crossed my mind as I read NY Times Media Equation columnist David Carr’s excellent analysis of the media fascination with Apple in light of last week’s “Applemageddon” news orgy. (For those in tech PR not working with Apple, it seems like we were handed a mini-vacation during the 9/9 event – it was futile to be trying to pitch anything else, especially consumer-tech related). He wrote:

Apple’s ability to seize the moment and preoccupy the press is without peer. Think about it: Absent that showmanship and hype, the company announced two very good-looking, very expensive phones that catch up with consumers’ preference for larger screens, a smartwatch… and a payment system that will need buy-in from retailers. So, what is it about Apple that makes a sea of professional curmudgeons whoop like children on Christmas?

He went on to list some of the tricks from Apple’s PR playbook.

Given the company’s history of maniacal secrecy… its sway with the news media is even more remarkable…. the stage management of its events rivals what is being announced... Seating charts are meticulously studied, rehearsals are endless and strategic leaks are used to temper expectations… The audience claps because everything — the lighting, the fanfare, the reveal — is meant to elicit applause.

On the one hand, Apple’s success with the media might not be that surprising as they use tried and true tactics, like stealth, and stagecraft to maximal effect. Yet another vendor would probably would not get the same results with these tricks. Why is that?

The answer lies in the story energy, taste, and the intoxicating power that an intangible such as brand can have. If reporters lose perspective and swoon, who can blame them? They are people too. They love a good story, and love to fall in love.

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Filed Under: Branding, Media, PR, Technology

Do Nice Headlines Finish First?

Posted by on August 11, 2014 with 0 Comments

We had a media training session this week involving one of our larger clients last week. NaughtyOrNice1_zps06c1f9f3

Executives from around the world flew in to learn about the art of getting key points across in press interviews, and take turns in the Hot Seat (mock interviews with real journalists).

I love these sessions because they help us bond with clients, and share experiences and observations about the worlds of technology and the media.

We commiserated about the increasingly negative and provocative tone of tech reporting. The tech trade press used to be a safe place to share your story, and get your messages across unchallenged. These days, it seems, everyone is after that biting headline that draws viewers and clicks.

That is the perception, but is it true? I saw two articles in the NY Times last week that are relevant to the question – one about the dangers of being too incendiary, and the second, which seems to show people enjoy and prefer to share positive stories.

In Stumbling Along in the Race to be Provocative, William Rhoden wrote:

Stephen A. Smith will return to active duty this week at ESPN, which suspended him for being overzealous — and imprecise — while doing what he is paid to do: provoke and incite. [His] remarks are the latest example of how the line between being thought-provoking and merely provoking has become blurred and how thoughtful discourse has been compromised.

histrionics are intended not as much to facilitate debate as to draw, and keep, fans. As competition has escalated, news media outlets have become increasingly obsessed with their audience numbers. We want your eyes, your ears, your wallets.

Heated debates around polarizing figures and polarizing quotations make for good copy and great TV. But do they lead to positive change?… As we chase dollars, we make progressively less sense

Sheila Marikar wrote in her story On the Nice Internet, Caring is Sharing

Anchored by websites including Thought Catalog, Upworthy and ViralNova, this is an Internet that aims to lift up, not take down…But behind their warm and fuzzy veneers, these growing media companies are businesses, and they peddle in uplifting content because they believe it’s profitable.

“A lot of it is clicky headlines and shareable headlines, and shareable headlines that play with certain identities.. people want to share with their friends to self-represent,” Mr. Magnin said. Indeed, his site has filled a void: Thought Catalog’s compilation of life advice, nostalgic lists and “betcha didn’t know this” type wisdom drew more than 34 million unique visitors in June, according to Quantcast.. the website of Time magazine had about 2.6 million unique visitors during the same month.

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iPhone Case Cage Match at Fusion PR

Posted by on May 30, 2014 with 0 Comments

Cross-posted on Flack’s Revenge

My email query to the Fusion PR team set off a frenzied debate, about the best case to protect an iPhone Cagematch_thumb1 from damage.

I am a chronic phone dropper, and my old phone had just died after one too many. Luckily, it was insured. Unluckily, there was a hefty $200 deductible to replace the phone (which I learned was necessary, after going to Apple’s Genius Bar. The tech came back from some quick exploratory surgey; he looked at me grimly, and just shook his head – the patient was gone).

But Asurion, the inurance company, shipped me a new one overnight, which was great. It was a 5s, a step up from my old iPhone 5. Getting my apps and data back, and getting started with the new phone, were incredibly easy, nothing short of miraculous, via iCloud, and a wizard that walked me through the process.

So I sent the request to the Fusion team and got lots of great email suggestions. The camps seemed split between Otterbox, which some said is clunky, and Lifeproof, which one person called “a dream”. The IT guy favors Evutec: “Nice price at $49.95 and great carbon fiber case.”

The email back and forth turned into some trash talking, and eventually they took the debate offline. The Lifeproof zealot dared the IT guy to a drop test in our NY office – he declined, but she dropped her phone. It survived (I wouldn’t recommend trying this, but word has it that Lifeproof will pay you if a phone with their case gets damaged in a drop).

This is the team I am proud of!. They debate the issues on an intellectual level, and then slug it out, without taking prisoners – don’t get in their way!

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Posted by on May 28, 2014 with 0 Comments

The New Tech PR Launch

Last week we hosted a seminar at Fusion PR, about the New Tech PR Launch, in conjunction with Internet Week.. Attendance was great, and tech journalist Brian Nadel sat in to field questions and share his insight (thanks, Brian!). Stay tuned for the e-book…

  1. Our guest Brian Nadel from @Computerworld mentioned he gets over 100 #pressreleases each day: 99% aren’t read #Launch411atIWNY #PR #IWNY
  2. Great tip from #Launch411atIWNY: Something journalists HATE? Starting a follow-up email with “Not sure if you saw this” #PR #IWNY2014
  3. One of @nadelbrian‘s biggest PR pet peeves: not including a photo or FTP site with info about a product #Launch411atIWNY #IWNY2014
  4. Before you launch your startup know what your goal is: Eyeballs? Sales? Media attention? Reviews? #Launch411atIWNY #IWNY2014
  5. Enjoyed Fusion PR’s Tech PR Launch seminar. Very informative. #IWNY

 

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Capture Attention with a Striking Visual Image

Posted by on May 1, 2014 with 0 Comments

Cross-posted on Flack’s Revenge

“Dig, if you will, the picture…” Prince 20120605_headlines-a

“Every picture tells a story, don’t it?” Rod Stewart

“All I’ve got is a photograph…” Def Leppard

If my musical tastes seem dated (and say something about my age), you might think that the pop artists of the 70s and 80s were singing to today’s content marketers. Pictures are increasingly the visual headline that draw in and engage readers.

Images Stand Out in a Crowded Media Marketplace

Content marketing is growing as more and more marketers jump on board. This adds to the din and makes it difficult to stand out. In a crowded media landscape, brands need to work harder to break through.. “Just write a great headline to reel them in!” goes the standard advice.

However in a sea of tweets, amidst an abundance of great content, an eye-catching image can trump a catchy headline. And, as images increasingly compete for attention too, using the right one can make all the difference in the world.

Selfies Sell!

Selfies have taken center stage in visual content marketing.  I say much more about this in my post that ran this week on the Getty Images Curve blog.

The post explains more about the use of images and short videos in content marketing – why they work, and how to find and choose the right image.

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The Tech Launch: From Big Bang to Long Campaign

Posted by on April 1, 2014 with 0 Comments

Cross-posted on Flack’s Revenge

Dorothy Crenshaw wrote a nice post about the decline of the tech PR launch on the Impressions blog. Eric-haze-the-party-is-over  She writes Some former colleagues in tech PR and I were talking recently about the “good old days” when nearly every tech launch included a splashy press conference. Today, not so much.  In my book, that’s a good thing. Lavish press conferences… have always struck me as a lazy strategy. But launches have changed

She goes on to list the reasons, such as a changing media landscape, and increassing emphasis on software, consumer tech, startups, and closer oversight of the spend by VCs.

I agree that the tech PR launch is not what it used to be, but at Fusion PR we have stopped thinking about launches as one-shot, Big Bang events long ago. It is for the reasons she lists, but also due to an increasingly noisy media/social media environment in which a burst of coverage is just not as impactful (also, most of our clients are startups – very rarely have they relied on press conferences, even going back to the start of the agency, during the dot-com era when VC dollars and PR fees flowed more freely).

For many of our clients, a launch is not just a debut, it’s a process that occurs over a period of time, and involves a number of related steps. Sure, it may start with a major announcement or unveiling, but rarely is that enough to really launch a company or product.

Also, while her point “software [which is less tangible and visible] trumps hardware” may have been true at one point, this is changing.  What about the all of the excitement and buzz about maker culture (typified by the creativity behind Arduino, Raspberry Pi) Google Nest, wearable tech, 3D printers, connected cars, etc.?

Anyway, Crenshaw’s larger point is well taken, I enjoyed reading it and appreciate the chance to chime in on the changing nature of tech PR launches.

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My Storify Wrap of Economist Big Rethink

Posted by on March 18, 2014 with 0 Comments

Economist Big Rethink Redux

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Economist Big Rethink Redux

I had the pleasure of attending The Economist’s Big Rethink conference in NY last week as a member of the media, after my friend Judy Gombita pulled some strings.

  1. Most of our clients are tech startups; the conference offered a CMO-level view of changes that are rocking the worlds of marketing and digital media. It let me see how the “big boys” do these things. Here were some of the highlights, including my live tweets.
  2. How do we deliver content with value? Start with what fascinates people & demonstrate expertise – Amanda MacKenzie #CMO @Aviva #bigrethink
  3. RT @christalago: Would you pay for Ad free Twitter? If not, do you know the trade you’re making with your data? #BigRethink
  4. “Understanding passion points and interests” is key for brand-consumer connection. @Unilever‘s Project Sunlight is a great eg #BigRethink
  5. Survey of #BigRethink audience: coolest thing brands can do on social: respond directly to user comments and tweets
  6. Make sure @rgeller you listen to @terryoinfluence recent (@cbcradio) show on Viral Videos BEFORE it goes behind the paywall…. #BigRethink

 

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Filed Under: Best Practices

Tips on Autoposting from 3 Experts

Posted by on February 26, 2014 with 0 Comments

Note: This post is an excerpt from my content marketing column on Maximize Social Business

I have a confession to make. I am an autoposter. Auto-posting

Why is this so tough to admit? Auto posting is controversial because it can result in spam if you’re not careful. Social media purists often react badly to any kind of automated posting or engagement. Perhaps they feel that a scheduled tweet is somehow less authentic.

I believe that auto posting (e.g. automating or scheduling updates), and its busy cousin auto-cross-posting (repurposing content across multiple networks) can be great ways to gain content, social media marketing efficiencies and boost results.

When done correctly, you can make the most effective use of original and curated content, and increase output across multiple channels. Do it with a light touch, be smart and you can have your auto posting, and satisfied users and communities too.

In this post I share tips based on research, my own experiences, and input from some of the top experts in the field.

The Mission: Improve Results Across Multiple Channels

Auto posting fits in with other tactics that are designed to boost social media efficiencies and output, like content curation, which I have covered in previous MSB columns. In 9 Surefire Content Promotion and Distribution Tips, I touched on auto posting only briefly, mainly to caution against a lazy and haphazard approach.

As I said at the outset, you need to be careful when auto posting so as not so spam or double up on content, and to make sure that updates are the right format, tone and style for each network/audience. E.g., there are quite a few ways to send your tweets to Facebook or LinkedIn. But are your goals and audiences different for each? And do the hash tags make it obvious that you are just sending your tweets over, without much thought or care?

Duplicate content or crosstalk can result from poor posting rules and methods. E.g. you can set up your WordPress blog to send a tweet when you have a new post; but be careful to avoid simultaneously tweeting the same thing from Buffer or HootSuite.

It can help to pick tools that are extensible and/or offer lots of built-in support for auto and auto-cross-posting. WordPress is open source and has a rich ecosystem of plugins, templates, etc. I have found that it offers more options than TypePad, for example. Driving auto posting from a central blog hub can work if your needs are modest (say, a single blog plus several social channels).

The ideal solution lets a team apply rules – to make sure the right content is going to the right places, from a hub or console – and edit updates and content before they go live, to adjust for each network. The benefits of a central, holistic approach are that you can better avoid crosstalk and be smarter about sharing the right content and updates in the right places.

Experts Chime In

I wanted to learn more. So I sought advice from experts, and asked:

  • If you take necessary precautions and are not just blasting everything everywhere – are there ways to programmatically repurpose content across multiple networks?
  • Bonus points to do this holistically vs. point-to-point – and to distribute original with curated content.
  • Which tools and approaches work best?

Here are their responses. It is interesting to note the differences in outlook, acceptance and approaches.

Neal Schaffer: “Tap new and evergreen content”

Neal Schaffer needs no introduction; however if you are new to this forum and Neal’s work, he runs the Maximize Social Business group blog, and is a social media consultant, author and Forbes Top 50 social media influencer. Here is his response:

“Humans can’t scale, so there is a need to rely on some automation in order to scale your organization and ensure your message becomes part of the conversation. Some avoid automation to the point that they never end up posting at all, which is a disservice to their community as well as themselves.

As far as best practices, I think we should look at two scenarios:

New Content: Auto-posting gives you the ability to ensure that your message is, at a minimum, communicated to your community. Can some people see through that it is automated? Sure. But if it is new content and relevant, I have found social media users to be accepting if done at a minimum of frequency. This can be achieved through a number of tools that can manipulate RSS feeds. My current favorites are HootSuite (which offers broad support for social networks) and PostPlanner (has niche support for Facebook) as well as the WordPress JetPack Publicize plugin.

Evergreen Content: Many companies have content that is evergreen, and considering it’s a best practice to post the same content multiple times in the same network (because we are all looking at different things at different times), tools can be used to ensure that this content is always part of your conversations. Once again, the frequency at which you post evergreen content could become a challenge – as well as ensuring that the content is still relevant today. The only tool that I have found, which I have also become a big fan of here, is SMQueue.”

Robin Good: “Blasting is blasting!”

Robin Good has been writing about news mastering, syndication, curation and collaboration from the earliest days of the Web. His MasterNewMedia blog is one of the top sites for these topics. Robin replied:

“You either automate this process or curate it manually. Yes there is some middle ground, but I think that the best and most fruitful way to repurpose content across different social networks and audiences is by manually customizing for each one.

The middle ground may be in using some tools that relieve and lighten part of this repurposing process, but never in relinquishing to an automated scheme. For example, I can curate a story on Scoop.it, and then repurpose it for Facebook and LinkedIn by rewriting the headline and intro completely, or send it to Twitter by simply adding relevant hash tags to it.

I can use IFTTT to create recipes that help me in automating part of this repurposing and personalization, but certainly at the sacrifice of some spontaneity and genuine communication. Blasting is blasting – see if any of the great journalists or authors ever do it. So a lot depends on the goal: is it “gaining” more eyeballs or clients, or is it about providing valuable info at the right time in a true personal voice?

I actually challenge you to show me any programmatic repurposing of content that doesn’t look automated, and that is evidently better than going the manual way. I’d love to discover that there are ways I am not considering.”

In response to my question about a holistic approach, Robin replied:

“Use a tool that allows you to treat content as an outlet-independent item. You write it once, but then it can go to many different places: websites, newsletters, social media channels, RSS, etc.

A number of tools, including HootSuite, OpenTopic.com or Scoop.it, and many others, allow you to do so, but there is actually a new breed of tools emerging that is designed from the ground up to help you do just that. The prime example of this new breed of content creation and distribution / repurposing tools is Shareist.com. Another one you could take in consideration is Co-Schedule.com.”

Robert Rose: “Yes, but avoid copy and paste shortcuts”

As head of Content Marketing Institute’s end-user client consulting practice, Robert Rose is a noted industry expert and authority who has graciously shared insight for this column a number of times.

Robert and the CMI team counsel some of the world’s biggest brands, so he is very familiar with enterprise scale solutions.

Here is what he said:

“The short answer is, yes, there are ways to programmatically repurpose content across multiple networks. Many modern enterprise WCMS (Web content management systems) will do this for all the owned channels – including social media. Many will even dynamically present this content based on attributes that are appropriate for that particular channel or network. For example, I can write an article for the website, and have the CMS automatically post an abstract to my blog’s right rail, which links to a “short version” on a landing page – with a call-to-action for the “full PDF” after a signup. Simultaneously, it could post a version of that article to Facebook, a tweet to Twitter and so on and so forth. This is the best way to think about content re-use across owned channels – whether or not you use a sophisticated CMS system to do it automatically, or hand-craft it across the same.

There are also ways to automatically repurpose content across various hosted networks as well (I call these rented channels, even though they are not necessarily paid for). These include things like RebelMouse, or Paper.li or those types of things – where I automatically curate and aggregate the various things I’m sending out into the world to create a “portal” into my brand’s particular point of view. This, to me, is interesting and is certainly fairly effortless (as most rentals usually are), but your mileage will definitely vary here.

Finally, on the curation side, there are also tools like PublishThis, where you can use their “light content management tools” to add your brand’s particular (and hopefully unique) point of view. I like this – especially when brands take care to package a number of stories – because it builds a unique content platform that adds an opinion to what would otherwise be just an aggregation of links.

The key in all of this, whether it’s a curated or owned strategy, is that it’s re-purposing not just re-using. Inherent in its name, re-purpose means that the content is altered for a different purpose. So, to the point you very appropriately made, it’s not just copying and pasting – it’s actually taking the time to figure out how the content can be different for an alternate purpose – and then executing that.”

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Filed Under: Best Practices, Social Media, Social Networks, Technology, Tools